5.10.2016

AN INTERVIEW WITH DUSTIN CARPENTER

Singer of Funeral Chic and head bang enthusiast.


What's up Dustin?
Personally, nothing at all. Same shit, different day. Livin' the proverbial dream.

Good to hear it. So, what's your favorite thing about North Carolina hardcore?
There's a loyalty and stubbornness the people here have that I've always loved and admired. I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.
I've noticed that too. Everyone I love from North Carolina has a good head on their shoulders as well. What other bands were you in before Funeral Chic?
I played in a band called Narratives for a few years prior to Funeral Chic. We've all played in a few bands before this, they were mostly terrible so we try our best to pretend like they never existed and that the future is bright. It's probably not, but pretending is nice.
I was listening to Narratives the other day actually, it still holds up in 2016. So, I'm assuming you're the lyrical mastermind behind Funeral Chic's lyrics. Where do you draw inspiration from for the subject matter in your lyrics? 
It varies. The shortest possible explanation is that each song comes from a different realm of irrational anger, hatred or depression. The music of Funeral Chic is a catalog of bad form and poor mental framework.
Well in the words of Nathan Englander, write what you know. So, the new Funeral Chic release is called Hatred Swarm. What can you tell me about it and how did you guys settle on that name?
Hatred Swarm was the title of the first song we wrote for this record. The phrase seemed to aesthetically embody the record as a whole. So, we just ran with what felt right. I can tell you that making the record was exhausting and time consuming. 2 years of writing and one year of recording culminated into 18 sloppy minutes of sonic intolerance to the intolerant. Everything else that could be said will be announced in the next week or so, come hell or high water.
What would you say you're most excited for people to hear when it comes to this record?
Mostly, I'm just excited to for people to actually hear it in it's entirety. Having been working on it for so long, the day people will get to finally hear the record as a whole will be a really exciting thing for me.
Oh, this record will definitely end up on more than a handful of Album of The Year lists. 
Now, for the personal questions. You've been a contributing member of the scene for years now. What would you say is wrong with hardcore right now? What would you say is keeping it alive?
Personally, I think the state of hardcore is great right now. At home, at least. It's becoming way more inclusive and the importance of that can't be over stated and I hope places everywhere keep it up. 
I can't really speak on what is wrong with hardcore, just because it's been really good to me for the last few years, but my only real criticisms are with the jaded, "I was born in an Earth Crisis t shirt, things were better back then" type people. Shit is mad annoying and counterproductive. There's cool shit happening all the time, all over the place and it's more easily accessible now than it ever has been. Take part or go back home and live in the past.
A great answer. Do you have any words to the youth?
Always respect the members of your community and earn their respect in return. Exceptions can be made for shitbags. No respect for shitbags. Unchecked aggression is pointless. 

Be angry for a reason. Always be weird.         

    

You can listen to Funeral Chic on Bandcamp and keep up with them on Twitter